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lengusa is a linguistic search engine and smart translator for perfecting your English, with its ever growing sentence database of over 300 millions records from reliable contexts. Its cluster of background services constantly collects, sanitizes, indexes and orders sentences with state of art algorithms and machine learning routines. It's never intended to replace common dictionaries or grammar checkers. Sole purpose of lengusa.com is giving you contextualized examples from reliable contexts, so you don't need to worry about your usage of English words or sentences.

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Results for "english sentence"

Word order may have grammatical meaning. Take the English sentence “Mary bit John.” In English, the common order for statements is subject-verb-direct object. So Mary means “subject,” and John means “direct object.” It’s Mary who does the biting, John who gets bitten.
He continued: "It's an important skill, and at the same time, most of us aren't professional authors, or novelists, or journalists. Writing an English sentence is important. I would say the same thing about coding. Understanding the algorythmic way of approaching problems is really important for everybody to get."
Delphine’s three children are bilingual in French and English and mix the two languages, resulting in a lot of ‘Franglish’ in the home (both Delphine and her husband are French). “They are more exposed to English, so it seems to take over in their brain and they use more English sentence structure when speaking in French.”
BBC
At St Jude’s C of E primary academy in Wolverhampton, where a third of the children are EAL students, year 5 teacher Julianne Britton has found handwriting particularly useful for teaching grammar. It’s an area where EAL students often fall down because English sentence structures are frequently very different to their native language, she explains.
If every English sentence needs a grammatical subject, (18D) must be modified: either by displacing ‘John’, as in (18S); or by inserting a pleonastic subject, as in (19). Note that in (19), ‘It’ does not indicate an argument; compare ‘There’ in ‘There is something in the garden’. Appeal to displacement also lets one distinguish the superficially parallel sentences (20) and (21).

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